NEW Kindermusik Semester Classes Register NOW!

January 25, 2010 at 8:44 pm | Posted in Babies, Kindermusik | Leave a comment
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Class: Village Cock-a-doodle-MOO! and Dew Drops             REGISTER TODAY!
Time: Monday at 9:15am
Class Meets: February 1 , 2010

Time: Thursday at 10:15am
Class Meets: February 4 , 2010

Cock-a-doodle-MOO! – Cock-a-doodle-MOO! – Hop on the hayride—it’s time to head for the farm! In this class, you will sing songs about the farm, including “Old MacDonald,” “Hayride,” and “Clever Cows.” You’ll engage in rituals and playful activities with your baby, including infant massage, lap bounces, exercise, and quiet time. During the week, you’ll enjoy their At Home Materials, looking through a playful picture book of animals and the sounds they make, as well as a CD of the songs heard in class and an instrument for music-making at home.

DewDrops – DewDrops – Stop and smell the roses—and lily of the valley, and tulips, and pansies. In this class, parents and babies will play and move together to songs about flowers, such as “Jasmine Flower,” “How Does Your Garden Grow?,” and “White Coral Bells.” You’ll also hear traditional Irish music, dance a jig and move to the “Irish Trot.” In your At Home Materials, you’ll will receive a CD of beautifully arranged songs from class, a board book of flowers, and an instrument for music-making at home.

Class: Our Time Away We Go!
Time: Monday at 10:45am
Class Meets: February 1 , 2010

Time: Wednesday at 9:15am
Class Meets: February 3 , 2010

Time: Tuesday at 5:30pm
Class Meets: February 2 , 2010

Away We Go! – Away We Go! – Hop on the train, get in the car, board the plane, and Away We Go! This class focuses on transportation, a favorite topic for toddlers who are on the go, go, go! Sing and play along with favorite songs, such as “I’ve Been Workin’ on the Railroad” and “Wheels on the Bus”. Explore fast and slow, smooth and bumpy, and high and low. Read stories about ways to get around. Shiny Dinah tells the story of a train, and Giddy-Up! has a horse, speedboat, racecar, and more to help you get where you want to go.  

Class: Imagine That! Toys I Make, Trips I Take
Time: Monday at 5:30pm
Class Meets: February 1 , 2010

Time: Thursday at 9:00am
Class Meets: February 4 , 2010

Toys I Make, Trips I Take – Toys I Make, Trips I Take – Think of it like taking a course inside your child’s imagination. We’ll use the theme of a toy shop to make our pretend-creations, using rhythm and songs with every imaginary saw, hammer, and nail. The result is building your preschooler’s sense of a sequence of events, which is good for storytelling, as well as making his ideas a reality.

Class: Family Time Here, There, and Everywhere
Time: Thursday at 6:15pm
Class Meets: February 4 , 2010

Time: Friday at 9:15am
Class Meets: February 5 , 2010

Here, There, and Everywhere – Here, There, and Everywhere – In this family-sized version of Kindermusik, the music and activities center around five different family outings: a visit with a friend, an outing at the park, a trip to the city, an afternoon at the aquarium, and a day on the farm. Your At Home Materials include a hand and finger puppets of Wags—a featured character in the two literature books. Plus, two home CDs of music from class, a home activity guide, and two jambourine instruments. Each item has been carefully created to bring out the music—and the learning—in your family. Specially designed to fit the varying ages and learning abilities of your children, this set will help you bring the learning and the music-making home, as well as become a lasting, well-loved favorite of the toy box and book shelf.

Class: Young Child Semester 2
Time: Thursday at 4:15pm
Class Meets: February 4 , 2010

Semester 2 – Semester 2 – Playing simple musical patterns and songs on the featured instrument from the first session—the glockenspiel—is a central focus this semester. While learning to sing a melody, and then play the pattern on the glockenspiel, we’ll delve deeper into the understanding of musical concepts such as piano and forte through orchestra-style music such as the William Tell Overture and Peter and the Wolf. Music appreciation and understanding continues with a complete introduction to the instruments—and the families in which they’re grouped—of the orchestra.

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Developing the Whole Child: Celebrating the Spirit of Each Child By Ruth A. Wilson Ph. D. is a very interesting article in this weeks Earlychildhood NEWS

September 4, 2009 at 10:24 pm | Posted in Kindermusik | Leave a comment
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What do Froebel, Pestalozzi, Montessori, and Rudolph Steiner have in common? Many of us recognize them as significant contributors to the child-centered approach to early childhood education, but what we may not realize is that they were also pioneers in the holistic education movement and believed that education should contribute to the spiritual development of children. They all viewed the young child as more than just a growing body and mind. They saw a spiritual dimension to human development as well.

…While the educational theories of Froebel, Pestalozzi, Montessori, and Steiner all reflect, to varying degrees, a spiritual framework, most of us are uncomfortable about openly expressing a commitment to spiritual development in our curriculum. This discomfort may be prompted, in part, by a fuzzy idea of what we mean by spirit and spiritual. To some people, making spiritual development a part of the curriculum suggests the teaching of religion. Fostering the spiritual development of children, however, need not involve religion at all. Spiritual development in its most basic form means development of the spirit, or the animating principle of our being. Spirit, in this sense, is often defined as the nonmaterial part of humans, in contrast to the body, which represents the material aspect of who we are. The word soul is sometimes used as a synonym for spirit, especially when used in the context of “body and soul.”

The meaning of spirit or spiritual development, as advocated in this article, differs from the religious definitions. It also differs from ethics and moral development. (read more)

Kindermusik is a Music and Movement program designed to teach music while stimulating both right and left brain, while social, emotional, cognitive, physical, language and literacy skills are all highlighted. Kindermusik is a Whole Child, Whole Brain curriculum. It is also a spirit filled curriculum, for it is by the nature of ‘being a child’ that spirit is cultivated. Kindermusik fills each child with an ‘abundance of themselves’ through all the activities in the classroom and through the relationships that are created and maintained. Kindermusik educators are instructed to ‘follow the child’ in our classrooms. We do just that, as it is then that your child will learn the most and in the manner that they need.

Check out Kindermusik, “Loving your child is what it’s all about!”

Fun in Kindermusik Around the World

Fun in Kindermusik Around the World

Kindermusik ~ A Whole Brain Activity

February 7, 2008 at 12:29 am | Posted in Brain Development, Children's Music, FUN, Kindermusik, Music, Music Making, Musical Instruments, Parenting, School Readiness, Singing, Wendy Jones, Whole Body, Whole Brain, Whole Child | 2 Comments
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Boy thinking

The following article is the result of pairing an article by fellow Kindermusik Educator, Wendy Jones with some thoughts of my own…

“The impact of music on your child’s early development is undeniable and profound. Pick up any paper or parenting magazine and you will find it awash with articles and new studies showing the importance of music in giving your child a healthy start for both mind and body. The same papers are filled with options for children- dance, piano, tot sports or gymnastics, and more. So, how to choose to give our children the best without overwhelming or over-scheduling them? One way of approaching your choices is finding an activity that creates an atmosphere to develop the whole brain and body.”

The idea of “whole brain” means utilizing both left and right brain at the same time. For example, left brain activity is responsible for logical thinking, facts, sequential and analytical thinking, while right brain activity is responsible for utilizing the imagination, creativity, feelings, and intuition. Music classes are one way of utilizing the “whole-brain”. As a result musical activity makes your child learn better. The key words here are “musical” and “activity”; not just listening to music but being involved in music making and musical moving.  

So what can your family do to provide a “whole-brain”, “whole body”, “whole child” experience? Be involved in musical learning and moving. For your youngest member of the family sing, dance, feel the beat, play instruments to the beat and expose them to a variety of quality musical experiences. As your child becomes more able to communicate participating in music and movement is still a key to learning. Now add memorizing of songs, learning about note values, and rhythm values, and facts about the kinds of music you move and sing to and you make it a “whole-brain”, “whole body”, and “whole child” experience. Plus it is just plain FUN! 

There are many articles online about this topic and I recommend if you are interested, that you Google right and left brain, and music and the brain and you will see literally millions of responses. However, there is something right here in Clayton that will assist you as a family to achieve “whole-brain”, “whole body”, “whole child” success! What is it? Kindermusik!

“In each level of Kindermusik’s classes, children and their parents sing, dance, play instruments, explore, make choices, develop new skills, and learn- together. Dancing and creative movement strengthens the body and increases coordination. Singing aids in expressive language development, good speech habits, and healthy lung development. Instrumental play develops eye-hand coordination and the ability to understand patterns and sequences. No rushing from class to class; it’s all right there in every Kindermusik lesson! But most importantly, families are sharing in the development of a love of music and learning, an interest their children will carry with them lifelong.” “I’m learning as much as she is!” comments one mother; “I wish I could have learned music like this when I was her age- this is just what I’d always hoped to find for her. We both look forward to it each week!”

No longer downtown but in the Riverwood Cultural Arts Center on Cunningham Lane, is Kindermusik of Clayton & Voice of Clayton. There are classes for infants through early elementary age children and they involve the family. Now is the time to look into what is being offered as Spring semester is starting. For the older elementary child and on through adult age there are private lessons. If your schedule is tight and you think you are too busy, you might want to check out the Monthly Specialsone day events and 4 or 5 day classes that allow you to try out Kindermusik without the semester commitment. Don’t forget Summer is right around the corner and there are short class offerings for you to break up the monotony of your summer already waiting online for you to sign up! Kindermusik of Clayton & Voice of Clayton offers a full range of Kindermusik Core programs, including Village for 0-18 months, Sign and Sing for 6 months-2 ½ years, Our Time for 1 ½ to 3 ½ years, Imagine That for 3 ½ to 5 years, and Young Child for 5-7 year olds. Additional classes for Families and Preschoolers are also available, as well as Monthly Specials to aid you in making a wise choice for your family, and private voice lessons for your older child and teen or even for you.  To learn more about Winter/Spring Semester, Monthly Specials and Summer Schedule opportunities please call Julie Stewart at 359-3473, or 359-0022; you may also email your interest to kmclayton@mindspring.com or check things out online where you can register now! www.kindermusikofclayton.com  Kindermusik of Clayton & Voice of Clayton is a part of the Riverwood Cultural Arts Center in the Riverwood Athletic Club Development.

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