Developing the Whole Child: Celebrating the Spirit of Each Child By Ruth A. Wilson Ph. D. is a very interesting article in this weeks Earlychildhood NEWS

September 4, 2009 at 10:24 pm | Posted in Kindermusik | Leave a comment
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What do Froebel, Pestalozzi, Montessori, and Rudolph Steiner have in common? Many of us recognize them as significant contributors to the child-centered approach to early childhood education, but what we may not realize is that they were also pioneers in the holistic education movement and believed that education should contribute to the spiritual development of children. They all viewed the young child as more than just a growing body and mind. They saw a spiritual dimension to human development as well.

…While the educational theories of Froebel, Pestalozzi, Montessori, and Steiner all reflect, to varying degrees, a spiritual framework, most of us are uncomfortable about openly expressing a commitment to spiritual development in our curriculum. This discomfort may be prompted, in part, by a fuzzy idea of what we mean by spirit and spiritual. To some people, making spiritual development a part of the curriculum suggests the teaching of religion. Fostering the spiritual development of children, however, need not involve religion at all. Spiritual development in its most basic form means development of the spirit, or the animating principle of our being. Spirit, in this sense, is often defined as the nonmaterial part of humans, in contrast to the body, which represents the material aspect of who we are. The word soul is sometimes used as a synonym for spirit, especially when used in the context of “body and soul.”

The meaning of spirit or spiritual development, as advocated in this article, differs from the religious definitions. It also differs from ethics and moral development. (read more)

Kindermusik is a Music and Movement program designed to teach music while stimulating both right and left brain, while social, emotional, cognitive, physical, language and literacy skills are all highlighted. Kindermusik is a Whole Child, Whole Brain curriculum. It is also a spirit filled curriculum, for it is by the nature of ‘being a child’ that spirit is cultivated. Kindermusik fills each child with an ‘abundance of themselves’ through all the activities in the classroom and through the relationships that are created and maintained. Kindermusik educators are instructed to ‘follow the child’ in our classrooms. We do just that, as it is then that your child will learn the most and in the manner that they need.

Check out Kindermusik, “Loving your child is what it’s all about!”

Fun in Kindermusik Around the World

Fun in Kindermusik Around the World

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7 Surprising Benefits of Music Education

August 17, 2009 at 7:34 am | Posted in Kindermusik | 2 Comments
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Listen to the singing, the laughing, and the shouting; the jumping, stomping, and clapping; the exuberant thumping of drums, the rhythmic rattling of maracas, and the festive jingling of bells. Listen to children making music, and it’s easy to hear they’re having fun.

What’s not so obvious is that while children are singing and clapping, jumping and wiggling, and shaking and tapping on instruments, there’s a whole lot of learning—and growing—going on.

Children, unlike adults, learn primarily through sound. They naturally focus attention more easily on sound than on visual stimuli. The rhythmic sound of music, in particular, captures and holds children’s attention like nothing else, and makes it a valuable learning tool.

Music education increases children’s intelligence, academic success, social skills, and even physical fitness, in ways that may surprise you.

Read the full article here.  7 Surprising Benefits of Music Education

Thank you Merri for pointing out this wonderful article.

Why Emotional Intelligence Matters and the role Music and Movement plays.

August 13, 2009 at 8:51 pm | Posted in Babies, Delopmental Stages, elementary, Parenting | 5 Comments
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Teaching emotional skills is making a big comeback.

Having Fun at Kindermusik

Having Fun at Kindermusik

In the current issue of Scholastic’s Instructor Magazine is a very pertinent article about this topic. Here is an excerpt from the article –

“In an era when high-stakes test scores rule, talking about social and emotional development in children can seem old-fashioned. But lately, the conversation about the so-called soft skills—the personal and interpersonal abilities kids need to maintain mental health and thrive socially, emotionally, and intellectually in a classroom—is being heard again around the nation. ” (read more here)

Kindermusik has developed a wonderful resource for parents regarding this same topic.

“Research demonstrates that involvement in music and movement activities from an early age helps children develop good social and emotional skills. Research also links social and emotional development with school-readiness and even with higher academic testing scores. It’s no surprise. After all, the same skills that foster emotional security and social success – skills like confidence, curiosity, cooperation, self-regulation, and good listening – predict cognitive achievement and academic success as well. ” Check out Music & Social-Emotional Development by Molia Dumbleton, M.A., M.A. and Heidi Gilman Bennett, read the summary here.  Read the full article for toddlers here. and for preschoolers here.

Just another reason Kindermusik would benefit your family this fall. Loving your child is what it’s all about!

Parents are you looking for ways to improve your child’s success?

June 22, 2008 at 12:37 am | Posted in Brain Development, Children's Music, emergent literacy, FUN, Kindermusik, Music Making, Music Together, Musical Instruments, Parenting, School Readiness, Singing | 2 Comments
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Kindermusik ~ Why enroll?

Mom and Baby                                                             
A recent study found that repeated enrollment in Kindermusik improves a child’s ability to plan, guide, and control their own behavior. 
• “Children currently enrolled in Kindermusik showed higher levels of self-control than those never enrolled and those previously enrolled ….This suggests that in order for children to reap the benefit of increased self-control as a result of Kindermusik participation, it is important to have repeated and recent Kindermusik experiences and remain enrolled in the program.”
• “Four-year-old children who had been exposed to Kindermusik for longer periods of time are better off in terms of self-control namely a child’s ability to plan, guide, and control their own behavior-than similar children with less Kindermusik history.”
• “These experiences, stop-go, high-low, fast-slow, short-long, and loud-soft, whereby children’s motor behavior is guided by the music, appear to be good exercise for young children’s emerging self-regulatory skills.”  

The study, “The Effects of Kindermusik on Behavioral Self-Regulation in Early Childhood,” was conducted in 2005 in the psychology department at George Mason University in Virginia. Results were made available to Kindermusik in May, 2005. The study was conducted by Adam Winsler Ph.D and graduate student Lesley Ducenne in the Department of Psychology at George Mason University. The 15-month study included 91 children between the ages of 3 and 5 who were split into three groups:  23 students currently enrolled in Kindermusik, 19 students previously enrolled in Kindermusik, and 49 students of similar family backgrounds from local preschools who had never had Kindermusik. The children were observed doing a variety of tasks that required selfcontrol such as slowing down their motor behavior, delaying their gratification, refraining from touching attractive but forbidden toys, quietly whispering, and compliance with instructions to initiate or stop certain behaviors. Parents also completed surveys.

The study was supervised by Adam Winsler, Ph.D, Applied Developmental Psychology in the Department of Psychology at George Mason University.

Girl and Xylophone

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

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