Do Re Mi as seen through the eyes of 200 Dancers in Antwerp

April 15, 2009 at 6:01 pm | Posted in Kindermusik | 1 Comment
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More than 200 dancers were performing their version of “Do Re Mi”, in the Central Station of Antwerp. with just 2 rehearsals they created this amazing stunt! Those 4 fantastic minutes started the 23 of march 2009, 08:00 AM. It is a promotion stunt for a Belgian television program, where they are looking for someone to play the leading role, in the musical of “The Sound of Music”.

Thank you for finding this Christa! Love it, Love it, Love it!

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Music lessons provide a workout for the brain

March 23, 2009 at 8:41 pm | Posted in Kindermusik | Leave a comment
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17:22 13 March 2009 by Andy Coghlan

Scans of the brains of child musicians before and after musical training have yielded compelling evidence that proficiency and skill relies on hard graft, not innate genius.

Earlier studies have shown that adult musicians have different brains to adult non-musicians. But the latest results settle arguments about whether the brain differences were there from birth, or developed through practice.

“This is the first paper showing differential brain development in children who learned and played a musical instrument versus those that did not,” says Gottfried Schlaug of Harvard Medical School.

Schlaug’s team tested musically untrained six-year-olds from the Boston area, 15 of whom then received weekly keyboard lessons for 15 months, and 16 of whom didn’t. When they compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans taken before and after for both groups, they found that auditory and motor areas of the brain linked respectively with hearing and dexterity grew larger only in the trainee musicians.

At the end of the training period, the musicians also outperformed the others at specific tasks related to manual dexterity and discrimination of sounds. But the two groups were matched on more distantly related skills such as arithmetic. Schlaug says that the same pupils are being followed in case it takes longer for these more “distant” skills to emerge. (read more)

Article on “Why Arts Education Is Crucial, and Who’s Doing It Best”

February 26, 2009 at 9:20 pm | Posted in Kindermusik | 1 Comment
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The following article was in the February, 2009 issue of Edutopia

“Why Arts Education Is Crucial, and Who’s Doing It Best”

… Art and music are key to student development. by Fran Smith

“Art does not solve problems, but makes us aware of their existence,” sculptor Magdalena Abakanowicz has said. Arts education, on the other hand, does solve problems. Years of research show that it’s closely linked to almost everything that we as a nation say we want for our children and demand from our schools: academic achievement, social and emotional development, civic engagement, and equitable opportunity.

Involvement in the arts is associated with gains in math, reading, cognitive ability, critical thinking, and verbal skill. Arts learning can also improve motivation, concentration, confidence, and teamwork. A 2005 report by the Rand Corporation about the visual arts argues that the intrinsic pleasures and stimulation of the art experience do more than sweeten an individual’s life — according to the report, they “can connect people more deeply to the world and open them to new ways of seeing,” creating the foundation to forge social bonds and community cohesion. And strong arts programming in schools helps close a gap that has left many a child behind: From Mozart for babies to tutus for toddlers to family trips to the museum, the children of affluent, aspiring parents generally get exposed to the arts whether or not public schools provide them. Low-income children, often, do not. “Arts education enables those children from a financially challenged background to have a more level playing field with children who have had those enrichment experiences,” says Eric Cooper, president and founder of the National Urban Alliance for Effective Education.
It has become a mantra in education that No Child Left Behind, with its pressure to raise test scores, has reduced classroom time devoted to the arts (and science, social studies, and everything else besides reading and math). Evidence supports this contention — we’ll get to the statistics in a minute — but the reality is more complex. Arts education has been slipping for more than three decades, the result of tight budgets, an ever-growing list of state mandates that have crammed the classroom curriculum, and a public sense that the arts are lovely but not essential.

This erosion chipped away at the constituencies that might have defended the arts in the era of NCLB — children who had no music and art classes in the 1970s and 1980s may not appreciate their value now. “We have a whole generation of teachers and parents who have not had the advantage of arts in their own education,” says Sandra Ruppert, director of the Arts Education Partnership (AEP), a national coalition of arts, business, education, philanthropic, and government organizations. (read more)

Song Around the World “Stand By Me” is an excellent view of Music Around the World as we begin our newest class of Imagine That “Cities~ Busy Places, Friendly Faces”

February 1, 2009 at 4:56 am | Posted in Kindermusik | Leave a comment
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One of the things I love about teaching Kindermusik to preschool and elementary age children is the opportunity to enlighten them about the rich and wonderful “world” of music. This semester our focus in Imagine That class is “Cities~Busy Places, Friendly Faces” where we enjoy music from cities all over the world and explore things like street vendor music, city rhythms, high and low musical concepts that are mirrored in the high buildings and elevators and escalators, the sounds of the city, street musicians, concert halls, ballet dancers, jazz musicians and much more. When I heard this video version of “Stand by Me” it reminded me of how in Kindermusik class we become a community and support each other teacher to parent, parent to child, family to family, student to teacher, friend to friend. What a wonderful way to explore the thought of standing by each other all over the world. Enjoy this version of a favorite song.

Kindermusik Rocks … Parent Testamonials

December 29, 2008 at 9:19 pm | Posted in Kindermusik | Leave a comment
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Christmas Music a la Boomwhackers!

December 16, 2008 at 2:12 am | Posted in Kindermusik | Leave a comment
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I use boomwhackers in Kindermusik for the Young Child…here is a wonderful opportunity to see them in action with a Holiday twist! 🙂 Such Fun!

Music Training Enhances Language Skills in Children

November 25, 2008 at 10:42 pm | Posted in Children's Music, Kindermusik, Music, Music Making | 1 Comment
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Recently at our Partnership of Kindermusik Educators Convention, Vice President of Product Development at Kindermusik International, Evanston, Illinois, Debby Pool, gave a presentation regarding this research done by Nina Kraus at Northwestern University’s Auditory Neuroscience Lab provides a fascinating look into why musical training as a child will actually enhance your child’s language skills. And you don’t have to become a professional musician to benefit! Enjoy!

April is Autism Awareness Month

April 1, 2008 at 11:13 pm | Posted in Autism, Brain Development, Delopmental Stages, Kindermusik, Music, Special Needs | Leave a comment
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Yes, April is Autism Awareness Month and there are many things occuring in the media to call attention to Autism Spectrum Disorders. It is becoming much more common for Autism to touch everyone’s lives in some way.

Kindermusik is uniquely chosen by families of children with autism because of its ability to touch their lives in a variety of ways. The challenges a family whose child is autistic faces deal with communication, verbalization, eye contact, socialization, emotional expression and repetition. The way music and movement are used as a tool to enhance growth in these areas make Kindermusik a wonderful match for increasing skill in the same areas of development while assisting mom and dad with an additional avenue of bonding.

If you are interested in learning more about the impact music has on Autism Spectrum Disorders just google Autism and Music.

Other awareness activities and events are planned not directly related to music’s impact. If you live in the Triangle area you might want to attend a free presentation in RALEIGH, NC – As part of his continuing health series, John C. Pittman, MD, of the Carolina Center for Integrative Medicine (CCIM), will present “Autism Spectrum Disorder: Treating Pervasive Developmental Disorders” on Tuesday, April 8 from 7:00-8:00PM. This free presentation is sponsored by Triangle Compounding Pharmacy and will be held at CCIM’s office located at 4505 Fair Meadow Lane, Suite 111 in Raleigh. Dr. Pittman will discuss how Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) and other DAN (Defeat Autism Now) Protocol modalities are being used to help children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Or keep your ears and eyes attuned to CNN’s website for special articles and videos from families impacted by autism.

Love, Love Me Do, You Know I Love YOU! Happy Valentines to you all…

February 11, 2008 at 3:31 am | Posted in Harmonica, Music, Our Time, The Beatles, Traditions, Valentine's Greeting | Leave a comment
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I was a pre-teen when this was first popular and it was one of my favorites! I hope you enjoy it. John Lennon is playing the harmonica Our Time families … just another one of those talents waiting to happen in your own family!

Away We Go!

February 6, 2008 at 11:32 pm | Posted in Away we go, Children's Music, Dancing, Family, FUN, Kindermusik, Music, Musical Instruments, Our Time, Shiney Dinah, train | Leave a comment
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Every day I teach Kindermusik is a day I see growth and success in the faces of young children and their parents.

 This evening in our second Away We Go class the entire group of children and their parents were so engaged and having fun. Our ‘train’ zoomed and crawled and stopped and started and whistled and dinged it’s way around and around. Even the shy ones became so involved. I must get the camera out again to capture some of this fun! During music and movement storytime you would have thought Shiney Dinah was right there in the midst of our class. The children were mesmerized during the story and already many of them are choo, chooing and tapping the beat to our train rhythm on every page. We hid and found egg shakers, car keys (specially made for class) and jingle bells over and over. I hid the keys on top of my head and wouldn’t you know that was a favorite place for all the keys to be found! Dancing was also fun! This is going to be a great semester!

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