Dance of a Thousand Hands revisited.

April 9, 2009 at 4:53 pm | Posted in Art, Asian, Hearing Impaired, Kindermusik, Music, Special Needs | 2 Comments

Thousand-Hand Guan Yin ~ There is an awesome dance, called the Thousand-Hand Guanyin, which is making the rounds across the net. Considering the tight coordination required, their accomplishment is nothing short of amazing, even if they were not all deaf. Yes, you read correctly. All 21 of the dancers are complete deaf-mutes. Relying only on signals from trainers at the four corners of the stage, these extraordinary dancers deliver a visual spectacle that is at once intricate and stirring. Its first major international debut was in Athens last year at the closing ceremonies for the 2004 Paralympics. But it had long been in the repertoire of the Chinese Disabled Persons’ Performing Art Troupe and had traveled to more than 40 countries. Its lead dancer is 29 year old Tai Lihua, who has a BA from the Hubei Fine Arts Institute. The video was recorded in Beijing during the Spring Festival this year. More information

As long as you are kind and there is love in your heart
A thousand hands will naturally come to your aid
As long as you are kind and there is love in your heart
You will reach out with a thousand hands to help others

Guan Yin is the bodhisattva of compassion, revered by Buddhists as the Goddess of Mercy. Her name is short for Guan Shi Yin. Guan means to observe, watch, or monitor; Shi means the world; Yin means sounds, specifically sounds of those who suffer. Thus, Guan Yin is a compassionate being who watches for, and responds to, the people in the world who cry out for help.

This is a repost of a fabulous video and a wonderful expression of what desire to excel can do to impact lives.

Baby CAN learn ASL and Communicate Faster and Better!

March 12, 2009 at 5:02 pm | Posted in Babies, Brain Development, Delopmental Stages, emergent literacy, Hearing Impaired, Kindermusik, Language, Parenting, Sign & Sing | Leave a comment
Tags: , ,
Sign & Sing Class

Sign & Sing Class

Dow Jones MarketWatch
3/12/09, 7:25 AM EDT
Parents can begin communicating early with babies by teaching them American Sign Language
By Debbie Cafazzo
TACOMA, Wash. – At 3 months old, Regan Finn started signaling to her parents when she needed a diaper change. At about 5 months, Katie Mingus could tell her parents when she needed help with something. And when she was 8 months old, Andelyn Boothby could ask clearly and politely for more milk.

Child prodigies?

Hardly.

The babies’ parents attribute their children’s early communications skills to the use of American Sign Language, or ASL. Neither the children nor their parents are deaf. But these Pierce County, Wash., parents say learning sign language helped boost their children’s language development, both in sign and in spoken words.

“I went into it skeptical,” says Jim Finn, Regan’s dad. “But I’ve been blown away by the results.”

Finn and his wife, Jody, who studied ASL in college, began signing to Regan from birth.

Every time they changed her diaper, for example, they made the sign for change. Eventually, Regan, who is now 20 months old, started making her own version of the sign.

“It probably saved us untold diaper rashes,” says Finn.

Rebekah Mingus, mother of Katie, who is now 17 months, says that learning to sign with her daughter probably sidetracked many tantrums. And Michelyn Boothby, Andelyn’s mom, says she was astounded at how fast her daughter, now 18 months, began stringing words together in sign language.

“It floored me,” she says. “Before she was even a year old, she was putting words together.” (read more)

As I have been teaching Sign & Sing created by Kindermusik and Signing Smart I have seen many of the same phenomenums. Signing children, talking earlier, parents amazed at what their children communicate, happier children due to lack of frustration, it is truly amazing! We are offering our Sign & Sing B, for children who already have begun signing and parents who want more, next Wednesday, March 18th at 9:15am. Our next Sign & Sing A will be scheduled as soon as we have interest.

Are you interested? Link through our website and let me know!

Dance of a Thousand Hands~Awesome Video!

June 10, 2007 at 7:20 pm | Posted in Asian, Blogroll, Dancing, Hearing Impaired, Kindermusik, Music, Music Making, Princesses! | 13 Comments


Fellow Kindermusik Educator Jeanne Lippincott sent a link to this video of the Dance of a Thousand Hands. Read on to understand the completely awesome nature of what this video encompasses… 

Thousand-Hand Guan Yin    ~    There is an awesome dance, called the Thousand-Hand Guanyin, which is making the rounds across the net. Considering the tight coordination required, their accomplishment is nothing short of amazing, even if they were not all deaf. Yes, you read correctly. All 21 of the dancers are complete deaf-mutes. Relying only on signals from trainers at the four corners of the stage, these extraordinary dancers deliver a visual spectacle that is at once intricate and stirring. Its first major international debut was in Athens last year at the closing ceremonies for the 2004 Paralympics. But it had long been in the repertoire of the Chinese Disabled Persons’ Performing Art Troupe and had traveled to more than 40 countries. Its lead dancer is 29 year old Tai Lihua, who has a BA from the Hubei Fine Arts Institute. The video was recorded in Beijing during the Spring Festival this year. More information

As long as you are kind and there is love in your heart
A thousand hands will naturally come to your aid
As long as you are kind and there is love in your heart
You will reach out with a thousand hands to help others

Guan Yin is the bodhisattva of compassion, revered by Buddhists as the Goddess of Mercy. Her name is short for Guan Shi Yin. Guan means to observe, watch, or monitor; Shi means the world; Yin means sounds, specifically sounds of those who suffer. Thus, Guan Yin is a compassionate being who watches for, and responds to, the people in the world who cry out for help.

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