Calling all Johnston County Kindergarteners!

August 23, 2009 at 8:33 pm | Posted in Art, Asian, Children's Music, Dancing, elementary, FUN, Kindermusik, Language, Music Making, Musical Instruments, School Readiness, Singing | 4 Comments
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Mom and Dad, is your kindergartener so ready to start school that you need something this week fun to do that feels a little like school? Something that has the elements of fun and games mixed with some sure to get your child ready for school activities? How about Kindermusik Adventures Around the World?

Tuesday-Friday, August 25th-28th from 8:00am-11:30am we will be exploring the music, dance, culture, games, and instruments of Japan, Germany, England, Africa, and Mexico. We will certainly have FUN as we become world travelers! Activities will include singing, dancing, storytelling, game playing, pretend play, crafts, instrument making, and food and culture exploration. Children will receive a home CD of the music we explore, a notebook of information including picture folders of activities, and songs from each country, a map placemat to help us find each country in our world, instruments and crafts from each country, and a carry bag with travel stickers and a passport to mark our journey! Materials cost is $40.00 and Tuition is $70.00 for this fun-packed time. Link here if you would like your child to join this enriching and fun week!

Why Emotional Intelligence Matters and the role Music and Movement plays.

August 13, 2009 at 8:51 pm | Posted in Babies, Delopmental Stages, elementary, Parenting | 5 Comments
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Teaching emotional skills is making a big comeback.

Having Fun at Kindermusik

Having Fun at Kindermusik

In the current issue of Scholastic’s Instructor Magazine is a very pertinent article about this topic. Here is an excerpt from the article –

“In an era when high-stakes test scores rule, talking about social and emotional development in children can seem old-fashioned. But lately, the conversation about the so-called soft skills—the personal and interpersonal abilities kids need to maintain mental health and thrive socially, emotionally, and intellectually in a classroom—is being heard again around the nation. ” (read more here)

Kindermusik has developed a wonderful resource for parents regarding this same topic.

“Research demonstrates that involvement in music and movement activities from an early age helps children develop good social and emotional skills. Research also links social and emotional development with school-readiness and even with higher academic testing scores. It’s no surprise. After all, the same skills that foster emotional security and social success – skills like confidence, curiosity, cooperation, self-regulation, and good listening – predict cognitive achievement and academic success as well. ” Check out Music & Social-Emotional Development by Molia Dumbleton, M.A., M.A. and Heidi Gilman Bennett, read the summary here.  Read the full article for toddlers here. and for preschoolers here.

Just another reason Kindermusik would benefit your family this fall. Loving your child is what it’s all about!

Study Links Preschool Behavior to Academic Success

November 30, 2007 at 10:57 pm | Posted in Children's Music, Delopmental Stages, elementary, FOL, Kindermusik, Parenting, School Readiness | Leave a comment

Study Links Preschool Behavior to Academic Success

Nov-26-2007 Salem-News.com

Results found that every seven-point increase in behavioral regulation over the school year predicted between three weeks and 2.8 months of learning gains in vocabulary, math and literacy.

(CORVALLIS, Ore.) – A study by an Oregon State University faculty member shows that preschool age children who do not master basic self-regulation skills such as paying attention and following instructions may fall behind in academic subjects including math and reading.

Megan McClelland, an associate professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences at OSU, and her colleagues used a game called the Head-to-Toes Task to assess a child’s ability to listen, pay attention and regulate their own behavior.

The researchers found that children’s performance on the behavioral regulation game significantly and positively predicted early literacy, vocabulary and math skills even after controlling for initial skills in those areas.

These findings contradict a recent controversial study that found weak or no association between children’s socioemotional skills – including attention – and learning.

In contrast, McClelland and other leading child development experts across the country find a direct correlation between specific aspects of school readiness such as self-regulation and academic success.

“How can a child have strong reading or math skills if they can’t sit still, pay attention or remember instructions?” McClelland said. “We found that the gains children made on a five-minute, self-regulation game over the preschool year predicted the gains they made in early reading, math, and vocabulary.”

The Head-to-Toes Task that McClelland and her co-authors used as a measure of behavioral regulation requires attention, working memory and inhibitory control.

More than 300 preschool children were tested at two different sites in Michigan and Oregon. The study controlled for age, gender and other background variables.

Results found that every seven-point increase in behavioral regulation over the school year predicted between three weeks and 2.8 months of learning gains in vocabulary, math and literacy.

McClelland said that some of the new research pointing to the overriding importance of early math and reading skills was based on less sensitive measurement of social skills and self-regulation, compared to relatively strong measures of early achievement.

“I don’t think you can separate a child’s behavior from their achievement during the early years of school,” she said. “When you give a 5-year-old a test to assess early math skills, you might be testing their ability to sit still, pay attention and follow direction just as much as testing their math ability.”

McClelland said the Head-to-Toes Task is a strong predictor of early achievement because it does not rely on parent or teacher reports, which can often be biased. Instead, it independently assessed the child’s ability to follow multiple instructions in the game and tracked their progress over the school year.

McClelland’s findings on the link between behavioral regulation and academic skills came out in the summer edition of Developmental Psychology.

Another paper that assesses the reliability and developmental trends of the Head-to-Toes Task, authored by McClelland and lead author Claire Cameron Ponitz of the University of Virginia, will be published in Early Childhood Research Quarterly in early 2008.

This Study when paired with the study, “The Effects of Kindermusik on Behavioral Self-Regulation in Early Childhood,” which was conducted in 2005 in the psychology department at George Mason University in Virginia; you see a very positive corelation. Consistant and frequent participation in Kindermusik classes will assist your child’s readiness for school and increase the likelihood of academic success.

So when you bring your child to Kindermusik you can be assured of providing him/her with a very valuable skill, plus having FUN! What could be better!

 

“A Snapshot of Kindermusik for the Young Child” 4th video!

June 22, 2007 at 7:34 am | Posted in Blogroll, Children's Music, Dancing, elementary, Kindermusik, Music, Music Making, Music Together, Musical Instruments, Parenting, Singing | 1 Comment

Here is the Capstone of all Kindermusik classes… Young Child!

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