April is Autism Awareness Month

April 1, 2008 at 11:13 pm | Posted in Autism, Brain Development, Delopmental Stages, Kindermusik, Music, Special Needs | Leave a comment
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Yes, April is Autism Awareness Month and there are many things occuring in the media to call attention to Autism Spectrum Disorders. It is becoming much more common for Autism to touch everyone’s lives in some way.

Kindermusik is uniquely chosen by families of children with autism because of its ability to touch their lives in a variety of ways. The challenges a family whose child is autistic faces deal with communication, verbalization, eye contact, socialization, emotional expression and repetition. The way music and movement are used as a tool to enhance growth in these areas make Kindermusik a wonderful match for increasing skill in the same areas of development while assisting mom and dad with an additional avenue of bonding.

If you are interested in learning more about the impact music has on Autism Spectrum Disorders just google Autism and Music.

Other awareness activities and events are planned not directly related to music’s impact. If you live in the Triangle area you might want to attend a free presentation in RALEIGH, NC – As part of his continuing health series, John C. Pittman, MD, of the Carolina Center for Integrative Medicine (CCIM), will present “Autism Spectrum Disorder: Treating Pervasive Developmental Disorders” on Tuesday, April 8 from 7:00-8:00PM. This free presentation is sponsored by Triangle Compounding Pharmacy and will be held at CCIM’s office located at 4505 Fair Meadow Lane, Suite 111 in Raleigh. Dr. Pittman will discuss how Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) and other DAN (Defeat Autism Now) Protocol modalities are being used to help children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Or keep your ears and eyes attuned to CNN’s website for special articles and videos from families impacted by autism.

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Special Needs in Kindermusik provides pure JOY!

February 29, 2008 at 10:41 pm | Posted in 2008, Autism, Children's Music, Delopmental Stages, Distal Trisomy 10, Family Support, Kindermusik, Special Needs | 1 Comment

Greyson December with Pat 

Greyson in December with Ms. Pat

“Wow, look at what Greyson is accomplishing in class now!” I am so amazed at how music influences the progress of special needs students in my Kindermusik classes. Greyson is one such child. He has Distal Trisomy 10, a rare genetic disorder. Greyson deals with challenges in physical, verbal and visual development. Over the course of the last two years attending Kindermusik classes at our studio I have seen him progress from a child who mostly mouthed instruments, with very little motor ability and almost no communication in class, to a child who not only is moving a lot (with assistance) and playing instruments. Greyson now reaches for the instruments he wants, sings in his own special way, and last night put his instruments away into our box when we finished letting go easily and smiled throughout the majority of class! Last night he wore his brand new glasses in class for the first time. It is an adjustment to have something on your face when you are not used to it. Mom was consistent in her approach and allowed him a break every now and then. By the middle of the class Greyson was looking all around with a much different expression on his face. Recently, before glasses, I observed that Greyson’s desire to keep pace with class activities was increasing. He loves walking around the room at a pretty quick pace holding mom or ‘Grandy’s’ hand and it is a joy to see his progress. The class is very supportive of Greyson’s involvement in class and as you can see he is having a great time!

Greyson Glasses

Greyson with Mom in February with his new glasses on!

Greyson glasses two

Greyson is in Family Time class with brother Ryan enjoying ‘Make Way for Music’!

Music’s effect on all children are evident in studies showing the significance of it’s impact on positive developmental skills in cognitive, emotional, social, physical, and language abilities. In special needs children it’s impact can be even greater!

Autism Speaks … link to help raise funds!

January 24, 2008 at 9:38 pm | Posted in Autism, Charities, Delopmental Stages, Family, Parenting, School Readiness | Leave a comment
The band, Five for Fighting, is generously donating $0.49 to Autism Speaks each time this video is viewed. The funding goes toward research studies to help find a cure. When you have a moment, please visit the link below to watch the video and pass it along. They are aiming for 10,000 hits, but hopefully we can help them to surpass this goal. http://www.whatkindofworlddoyouwant.com/videos/view/id/408214

Your smile counts. The more smiles you share, the more we donate. Join in!

See how music affects children — and parents!

September 28, 2007 at 3:44 am | Posted in Autism, Babies, books, Children's Music, Dancing, Kindermusik, Music, Parenting, School Readiness | 3 Comments

This is a great article in the current USA weekend.com website…read on!

Expert secrets to raising “great kids”

By Beth Arky

Anyone who has bonded closer with a baby while singing a lullaby or witnessed the pure joy of a movin’ and groovin’ toddler will be intrigued by a growing body of scientific evidence indicating that music plays an integral role in child development. A 2001 University of Valencia study traced the connection back even further, noting that “children who were played music in the womb showed more rapid development” in traits such as speech, gross and fine motor skills, and the ability to imitate faces. Another study found that kids as young as 3 could interpret emotional messages of songs.


“Children want to feel close and in emotional rhythm with their parents,” says child development expert Greenspan.


We wanted to learn more about this fascinating link, so we sat down with two people who are well-versed on the topic of kids: singer-songwriter Laurie Berkner and child development expert Stanley Greenspan.

Berkner, 38, recently was dubbed “the pixie Pied Piper of kid rock” by “Entertainment Weekly.” Her music videos air daily on Noggin, a commercial-free cable channel for preschoolers. The former preschool music teacher is now in bookstores with an illustrated version of her 1999 song, “The Story of My Feelings.”

Greenspan, 66, a clinical professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at George Washington University Medical Center, also has a new book out, “Great Kids: Helping Your Baby and Child Develop the 10 Essential Qualities for a Healthy, Happy Life.”

The two shared their thoughts on why music is so important for children — and for their parents.

USA WEEKEND: Dr. Greenspan, what role can music play in raising “great” kids?
Greenspan: Great kids have a number of qualities, including empathy, creativity, emotional range, and a sense of morality and caring about others. It begins with that engagement, that rhythm between the baby and the caregiver — often the mommy — in the first year of life. Then it blossoms in the second and third years with more complex social interactions. When language comes in, they can give voice to what it means to be happy or sad. So a song like Laurie’s helps them understand what a happy feeling or a sad feeling is. You’ll see it in their doll play or action-figure play. This helps them with empathy and creativity. If they’re going to be great novelists or write songs or perform, they have got to understand the feelings of others.
Berkner: It’s so great to hear you say it that way. When I wrote “The Story of My Feelings,” I was having a fight with a friend and wrote it to help me get in touch with my feelings. So actually, it was a completely self-centered act! I wrote the song a long time ago about how I feel better after I express myself, which is true. But now, I might have written it a little differently, because it also feels good to be expressing myself, not just afterward. But in hindsight, I do see that, “Yeah, the song can really help kids connect with their feelings.”

USA WEEKEND: Is it important for parents to sing and dance with their kids?
Berkner: It’s really about enjoying interaction with your child. It creates more of a connection with the caregiver, especially if feelings are coming up through the music. If I’m going to get down and play with Lucy [her 3-year-old daughter with husband Brian Mueller, 39] while she’s listening to a song, and she’s jumping around and I seem to be enjoying it, too, I’m validating her experience.
Greenspan: Children want to feel close and in emotional rhythm with their parents. It’s like when you’re with a good friend or someone you love very deeply. There’s a rhythm to the intimacy that makes you feel secure about yourself and the world. Listening to music brings people close; they’re sharing an experience. It’s an essential part of the development of empathy, of relating to others and emotional range.

USA WEEKEND: Laurie, parents of children with autism and other special needs have told you that your music helped their kids express themselves, while other methods have failed. Any thoughts as to why?
Berkner: The kids seem to want to be able to sing the songs. I’ve had lots of parents say that the first real words out of their children’s mouths came through stringing all these words together. Or they draw a picture to express that they want to hear a song. I wish I understood it better, but I like the fact that it happens.
Greenspan: What Laurie says is very, very important. I, and many of my colleagues, have a whole program for children with autism and other special-needs conditions called the Floortime approach. The essence is to follow the child’s lead and interests [during play] to form a relationship. From there we build communication. We found that some of the kids are very gifted musicians. The part of their brain that processes music functions extraordinarily well.

USA WEEKEND: Both of you make the case for learning through music, dance and creative play. Why?
Greenspan: When you move, you experience more fully. The more coordinated you become, the more you’re able to enjoy movement. It enforces the creativity of using your body, whether through dance or music. But now there’s a movement toward more impersonal forms of communication, from rote learning in education to parents being told to use flashcards rather than creative play with their kids to the overuse of text messages or hours of isolated self-absorption rather than being with real people.
Berkner: I think kids who are sitting at a computer are missing the physical component that they get through music and dancing. When they’re watching television, there’s at least a possibility they’ll get up and dance and let feelings come out. Think about “jumping for joy” — it’s the way we talk about our feelings sometimes. All of that seems to be so connected to being able to express ourselves.

About Laurie Berkner: The popular musician has a new illustrated book of her song “The Story of My Feelings.”
About Stanley Greenspan: The professor’s new book is about the 10 qualities that make for a “great kid.”

Watch video to benefit Autism Speaks.

May 1, 2007 at 6:05 am | Posted in and more!, Autism, Blogroll, Charities, Parenting, Ramblings | Leave a comment

Autism Speaks created a music video of the Five for Fighting song, “World”, which features images of autistic children and their families. It is a truly moving video and was the work of Bill Shea. The band is generously donating $0.49 to Autism Speaks for each time the video is viewed – the funding goes toward research studies to help find a cure. When you have a moment, please visit the link below to watch the video and pass it along to your friends and family.  They are aiming for 10,000 hits, but hopefully we can help them to surpass this goal.  http://www.whatkindofworlddoyouwant.com/videos/view/id/213154

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