Kindermusik ~ Seven Magnificent Years!

July 29, 2008 at 7:58 am | Posted in Babies, Children's Music, FUN, Imagine That, Kindermusik, Kindermusik for the Young Child, Music, Music Making, Music Together, Musical Instruments, Our Time, Singing, Village | Leave a comment
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Here is a video compilation of the Seven Magnificent Years of Kindermusik’s core curricula all recorded in classes at my studio. Enjoy!

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The William Tell Mom Song needs to be resurrected!

July 24, 2008 at 5:42 pm | Posted in Delopmental Stages, Family, FUN, humor, Kindermusik, Mom's, Mother's, Music, Singing | 1 Comment
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As we plan for the beginning of school in our area, many mom’s are thinking these things already! Let’s revisit a fun post and laugh for our own sake!

Here are the lyrics to this fun song by comedian Anita Renfroe, as she sings in 2 minutes 55 seconds what a mom says…

“The Mom Song”

Get up now
Get up now
Get up out of bed
Wash your face
Brush your teeth
Comb your sleepyhead
Here’s your clothes and your shoes
Hear the words I said
Get up now! Get up and make your bed
Are you hot? Are you cold?
Are you wearing that?
Where’s your books and your lunch and your homework at?
Grab your coat and gloves and your scarf and hat
Don’t forget! You gotta feed the cat
Eat your breakfast, the experts tell us it’s the most important meal of all
Take your vitamins so you will grow up one day to be big and tall
Please remember the orthodontist will be seeing you at 3 today
Don’t forget your piano lesson is this afternoon so you must play
Don’t shovel
Chew slowly
But hurry
The bus is here
Be careful
Come back here
Did you wash behind your ears?
Play outside, don’t play rough, will you just play fair?
Be polite, make a friend, don’t forget to share
Work it out, wait your turn, never take a dare
Get along! Don’t make me come down there
Clean your room, fold your clothes, put your stuff away
Make your bed, do it now, do we have all day?
Were you born in a barn? Would you like some hay?
Can you even hear a word I say?
Answer the phone! Get off the phone!
Don’t sit so close, turn it down, no texting at the table
No more computer time tonight!
Your iPod’s my iPod if you don’t listen up
Where are you going and with whom and what time do you think you’re coming home?
Saying thank you, please, excuse me makes you welcome everywhere you roam
You’ll appreciate my wisdom someday when you’re older and you’re grown
Can’t wait till you have a couple little children of your own
You’ll thank me for the counsel I gave you so willingly
But right now I thank you not to roll your eyes at me
Close your mouth when you chew, would appreciate
Take a bite maybe two of the stuff you hate
Use your fork, do not burp or I’ll set you straight
Eat the food I put upon your plate
Get an A, get the door, don’t get smart with me
Get a grip, get in here, I’ll count to three
Get a job, get a life, get a PHD
Get a dose of,
“I don’t care who started it!
You’re grounded until you’re 36″
Get your story straight and tell the truth for once, for heaven’s sake
And if all your friends jumped off a cliff would you jump, too?
If I’ve said it once, I’ve said at least a thousand times before
That you’re too old to act this way
It must be your father’s DNA
Look at me when I am talking
Stand up straighter when you walk
A place for everything and everything must be in place
Stop crying or I’ll give you something real to cry about
Oh!
Brush your teeth, wash your face, put your PJs on
Get in bed, get a hug, say a prayer with mom
Don’t forget, I love you
And tomorrow we will do this all again because a mom’s work never ends
You don’t need the reason why
Because, because, because, because
I said so, I said so, I said so, I said so
I’m the mom, the mom, the mom, the mom, the mom!!
Ta da!!!

Thank you Jeanne Lippencott for having these lyrics on your blog!

Benjamin Zander on Music and Passion via TED.com

July 23, 2008 at 5:41 pm | Posted in Kindermusik, Music, Music Making | Leave a comment
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In November of 2006 Benjamin Zander was a keynote speaker at our Annual worldwide PKE (Partnership of Kindermusik Educators) Convention in Greensboro, NC. He was phenomenal and he helped direct us to reach for the possible, to make challenges into possibilities.

In these tough economic times I am finding it very helpful to revisit the ideas put forth by Maestro Zander. You may find them enlightening as well. Here is a link to his ideas on TED.com. The talk is about 20 minutes long so plan ahead. It is well worth it!

Thank you Careyanne Deyo for bringing this up on your blog!

Music Lessons from an Economist’s Point of View

July 20, 2008 at 11:20 pm | Posted in Children's Music, Kindermusik, Music, Music Making, Musical Instruments, Parenting, Singing | 15 Comments
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Make-up Music Lessons from an Economist’s Point of View
By Vicky Barham, Ph. D.
I’m a parent of children enrolled in Suzuki music lessons. I’d like
to explain to other parents why I feel – quite strongly, actually –
that it is unreasonable of we parents to expect our teachers to make
up lessons we miss, even if I know as well as they do just how
expensive lessons are, and, equally importantly, how important that
weekly contact is with the teacher to keeping practising ticking
along smoothly. I think that it is natural for we parents to share
the point of view that students should have their missed lessons
rescheduled, but if we were to ‘walk a mile’ in our teachers’ shoes,
we might change our minds about what it is reasonable for us to
expect of our teachers.

Like many parents, I pay in advance for lessons each term. In my
mind, what this means is that I have reserved a regular spot in the
busy schedules of my sons’ teachers. I understand – fully – that if I
can’t make it to the lesson one week (perhaps my son is sick, or we
are away on holiday, or there is some other major event at school)
then we will pay for the lesson, but that my teacher is under no
obligation to find another spot for me that week, or to refund me for
the untaught lesson. And this is the way it should be.

In my ‘other life’ I am an economist and teach at our local
university. Students pay good money to attend classes at the
university; but if they don’t come to my lecture on a Monday morning,
then I am not going to turn around and deliver them a private
tutorial on Tuesday afternoon. When I go to the store and buy
groceries, I may purchase something that doesn’t get used. Days or
months later, I end up throwing it out. I don’t get a refund from the
grocery store for the unused merchandise. If I sign my child up for
swimming lessons at the local pool, and s/he refuses to return after
the first lesson, I can’t get my money back. So there are lots of
situations in our everyday lives where we regularly pay in advance
for goods or some service, and if we end up not using what we have
purchased, we have to just ‘swallow our losses’. On the other hand,
if I purchase an item of clothing, and get home and change my mind, I
can take it back and expect either a refund or a store credit.

So why do I believe that music lessons fall into the first category of
‘non-returnable merchandise’, rather than into the second case
of ‘exchange privileges unlimited’ (which I think is one of the
advertising slogans of an established women’s clothing store!)?
Speaking now as an economist, I would claim that the reason is that
items like clothing are “durable goods’ – meaning, they can be
returned and then resold at the original price – whereas music
lessons are non-durable goods – meaning, once my Monday slot at 3:30
is gone, my son’s teacher can’t turn around and sell it again. The
only way she would be able to give him a lesson later in the week
would be if she were to give up time that she had scheduled for her
own private life; and that seems pretty unreasonable – I can’t think
of many employees who would be thrilled if their bosses were to
announce that they couldn’t work from 3:30 to 4:30 this afternoon,
but would they please stay until 6:30 on Thursday, because there will
be work for them then!

Many teachers hesitate to refuse our request to shift lesson times
(because our busy schedules *do* change), because unless they keep us
parents happy, we will decide to take our child somewhere else for
lessons (or to drop musical study), and they will lose part of their
income. This is particularly true in areas with lower average income,
where it can be particularly difficult to find students. So rather
than telling us that ‘well, actually, the only time when I’m not
teaching and that you can bring your son for lesson is during the
time I set aside each week to go for a long soul-cleansing walk, and
I *can’t* do that on Monday at 3:30 when you should have turned up’,
they agree to teach us at a time that really doesn’t suit their
schedule. Teachers who are ‘nice’ in this way often, in the long run,
end up exhausted, and feeling exploited; they try to draw a line in
the sand. However, too few parents ask to switch only when absolutely
necessary, and too many parents want lesson times when it suits them
this week, which is not the same time that suited last week. The only
time that I would feel entitled to discuss shifting a lesson time is
if the reason I can’t make the lesson is because (i) I have to do
something for the Suzuki school and the only time at which that other
event can happen is during my lesson time; (ii) my teacher were to
ask us to participate in some other activity (e.g., orchestra, etc.)
and that other activity were to create the conflict. If the conflict
arises because my child is in the School play, and they have their
dress-rehearsal during his lesson time, then I feel that I must
choose between the two activities, and if he attends the dress
rehearsal my private lesson teacher doesn’t owe me anything.

During May, my eldest son will be missing three lessons because he is
going to accompany me on a trip to New Zealand to visit his great-
grandparents. I do not expect my son’s teacher to refund me for those
missed lessons, or to reschedule them by ‘doubling up’ lessons in the
weeks before or after our departure. Since there will be lots of
advanced notice, I might ask her to consider preparing a
special ‘practice tape’ for that period, or to answer my questions
via e-mail, but if she doesn’t have the time (the second half of
April is going to be really busy for her, and she wouldn’t be able to
do the tape until more or less the week we left) and so has to
refuse, then that’s fine. I certainly don’t expect her to credit me
with three make-up lessons; there is no way for her to find a student
to fill a three-week hole in her schedule during our absence.
Instead, I hope that she will enjoy the extra hour of rest during
those three weeks, and that we will all feel renewed enthusiasm when
we return to lessons at the end of the trip.

Article Copyright © 2001Vicky Barham

Vicky Barham, Ph. D., is the mother of two children who are enrolled
in Suzuki music lessons in Canada. She also teaches Economics at the
University of Ottawa. The TMTA webmasters became acquainted with Dr.
Barham through the Internet and were so impressed with her sound and
logical expressions about music teaching that we asked permission to
publish her ideas for all to share. Her ideas are expressed in two
articles on this website. The article on make-up lessons may be
printed and distributed to others as long as you do not charge any
fee for the article and as long as you give Dr. Barham credit for the
article. Thank you to Dr. Barham for so generously sharing her
expertise with us.

Kindermusik Fall 2008 Semester at Kindermusik of Clayton & Voice of Clayton

July 18, 2008 at 1:17 am | Posted in Babies, Children's Music, Family, FUN, Imagine That, Kindermusik, Music, Music Making, Music Together, Musical Instruments, Our Time, Sign & Sing, Singing | 1 Comment
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Fall Semester begins September 2, 2008 at Kindermusik of Clayton & Voice of Clayton
Check out our Kindermusik Curricula Descriptions below
and please visit our
Website for the Schedule and Registration information.

Village (newborn to 1 ½ years)

Zoom Buggy Home Materials

Zoom Buggy Home Materials

Zoom  Buggy!—Swoosh, vroom, and clickety-clack your way through this delightful unit. Babies and adults will dance, sing, and play instruments to the theme of being on the go. Chug around the room to the song “Little Red Caboose,” hold on tightly while “Riding in the Buggy,” and dance your way to “Zoom-e-oh!”  Engage in rituals and playful activities such as infant massage, lap bounces, exercise, and quiet time.

Home Materials: Colorful board book—Zoom Buggy, Home CD of the songs heard in class, two Art Banners, and a baby instrument for music-making at home.

 

Dream Pillow Home Materials

Dream Pillow Home Materials

Dream Pillow—This title alone brings images of rocking, cuddling, singing, and lulling to sleep.  But leading up to sleepy time are many upbeat and playful activities.  Babies and Adults will swirl to a dreamy cloud dance “Meet Me Tonight in Dreamland.” They’ll also play baby appropriate instruments to “Aiken Drum,” and “Sarasponda.” Favorite nursery rhymes like “Wee Willie Winkie,” and “Diddle, Diddle, Dumpling,” are sprinkled throughout the classes. It’s easy to weave many of the class songs and activities into your families’ daily routines. Home Materials: Board book that calms and relaxes—Dream Pillow Lullaby, Home CD of the songs heard in class, two Art Banners, and a baby instrument for music-making at home.

Our Time (1 ½ years to 3 years)

Milk & Cookies Home Materials

Milk & Cookies Home Materials

Milk & Cookies makes everyday home activities and chores easier and more fun with music! Cook and sing to “The Muffin Man”; dust and clean to the original song “In My House”; get ready to wash clothes to the delightful poem “Washing Machine”. Baking cookies, eating cupcakes, blowing on hot cross buns, wiggling like jelly, going grocery shopping and making tea are all represented in familiar as well as new songs. Move, play, and sing together in developmentally appropriate activities created just for 1 ½ to 3-year-olds. Capture the familiar and new moments of the day and learn how music can impact your toddler.
Home Materials: Two Books—At My House and Cookies, Two Home CDs, Stir Xylophone instrument, and a Home Activity Book—all arriving in a durable lunch bag.

Imagine That! (3.5 years to 5 years)

Hello Weather Home Materials
Hello Weather Home Materials

Hello Weather! Let’s Play Together!—sunshine, rain, snow, thunderstorms, and more in this imaginative and delightful weather-related musical adventure. Preschoolers create storm sounds with a drum to “Wild Storms,” jump in pretend puddles to “Mud Puddle Jump,” throw pretend snow-balls to “Snowballs,” and sing along to “Colors of the Rainbow.” They’ll be surrounded in a creative musical environment that integrates music, pretend play, story telling, movement, and more.
Home Materials: Two books—Michael Finnigan and Hurry Home, Little Kittens, Hello Weather Play Set, Two Home CDs, Family Activity Book, and Instruments—ankle bells and rain shaker with scraper.
Young Child (5 years to 7 years)

Young Child Semester One Home Materials

Young Child Semester One Home Materials

A pressure-free approach to learning, but concrete enough because your child is ready for the more abstract thinking processes that music requires. Play remains the primary way a young child learns, so throughout the curriculum there is a consistent effort to balance active learning with the emotional reasoning aspects of a young child’s development in mind.
Home Materials: Children’s Folder, Music At Home cards & stickers, Games Bag, Family Songbook, Home CD, and Carry Bag. Instruments can include glockenspiel w/mallets, dulcimer, and recorder.

Family Time  (Newborn through 7 years)

Here There & Everywhere Home Materials

Here There & Everywhere Home Materials

Here, There and Everywhere—the five sub-themes center around different family outings:  a visit with a friend, an outing at the park, a trip to the city, an afternoon at the aquarium, and a day on the farm.  Move like animals with this unit’s story Flip-Flap, Sugar Snap!  And follow a girl’s adventure as she loses her jambourine during the day’s outings and then finds it in the story Jingle-Jangle Jambourine. 
Home Materials: Two Books—Flip-Flap, Sugar Snap! and Jingle-Jangle Jambourine, Two Home CDs, Family Guide, Board Game, Waggs the dog Hand Puppet and Finger Puppet, and Two Jambourine instruments.

Sign & Sing (6 months through 3 years)

Sign & Sing A Home Materials

Sign & Sing A Home Materials

Session A: Everyday items around the house—a ball, bubbles, mom and
dad—become the objects of learning in the classroom and at home.
You’ll teach parents the sign language methods of the experts, such as making the sign in front of a child, on a child’s body, and knowing when a child is most engaged and ready to learn. All assembled in this easy-to-understand format so you can open your teacher’s kit, and be in the classroom teaching with confidence.

Sign & Sing B Home Materials

Sign & Sing B Home Materials

Session B: This session reviews the first three Keys to Signing Smart Success™ and provides an in-depth look at the final and fourth Key. New concepts such as in and out, up and down, big and little, tall and short will be explored with more songs and animal-themed activities.

Musical Theatre Camp was Awesome!

July 15, 2008 at 11:15 pm | Posted in Chorus, FUN, Kindermusik, Music, Singing, Voice Students | Leave a comment
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Musical Theatre camp 1
Musical Theatre camp 1

Last week four students performed an awesome Musical Theatre Production after a whirlwind week in the studio. Their performance WOWED guests in a dinner theatre style performance at First Baptist Church in the Fellowship Hall. Selections we staged, costumed, and performed included Be Our Guest, Belle, Do-Re-Mi, My Favorite Things, Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, It’s a Hard-Knock Life, Tomorrow, Hakuna Matata, Tripping Hither-Tripping Thither, Three (Four) Little Maids, It’s Possible and Green Eggs and Ham. Although we lacked in sleep :), the week was a concentrated learning experience that really gave everyone a big peak into what it’s like to be in a real performance group. It was non-stop fun!

Here are a couple of Rehearsal pics…

National Anthem

July 5, 2008 at 8:58 am | Posted in Music | Leave a comment
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Happy Fourth of July! I know this is a repeat of last year but this years isn’t able to be loaded yet. 🙂

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