Special Needs in Kindermusik provides pure JOY!

February 29, 2008 at 10:41 pm | Posted in 2008, Autism, Children's Music, Delopmental Stages, Distal Trisomy 10, Family Support, Kindermusik, Special Needs | 1 Comment

Greyson December with Pat 

Greyson in December with Ms. Pat

“Wow, look at what Greyson is accomplishing in class now!” I am so amazed at how music influences the progress of special needs students in my Kindermusik classes. Greyson is one such child. He has Distal Trisomy 10, a rare genetic disorder. Greyson deals with challenges in physical, verbal and visual development. Over the course of the last two years attending Kindermusik classes at our studio I have seen him progress from a child who mostly mouthed instruments, with very little motor ability and almost no communication in class, to a child who not only is moving a lot (with assistance) and playing instruments. Greyson now reaches for the instruments he wants, sings in his own special way, and last night put his instruments away into our box when we finished letting go easily and smiled throughout the majority of class! Last night he wore his brand new glasses in class for the first time. It is an adjustment to have something on your face when you are not used to it. Mom was consistent in her approach and allowed him a break every now and then. By the middle of the class Greyson was looking all around with a much different expression on his face. Recently, before glasses, I observed that Greyson’s desire to keep pace with class activities was increasing. He loves walking around the room at a pretty quick pace holding mom or ‘Grandy’s’ hand and it is a joy to see his progress. The class is very supportive of Greyson’s involvement in class and as you can see he is having a great time!

Greyson Glasses

Greyson with Mom in February with his new glasses on!

Greyson glasses two

Greyson is in Family Time class with brother Ryan enjoying ‘Make Way for Music’!

Music’s effect on all children are evident in studies showing the significance of it’s impact on positive developmental skills in cognitive, emotional, social, physical, and language abilities. In special needs children it’s impact can be even greater!

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1 Comment »

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  1. Lovely! Thanks for sharing the story, Julie! ~Lori


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